FO: Transposition shawl

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I love finishing projects, especially now that I am on my handmade wardrobe journey and there is more chance I will actually wear my finished object (FO). The other great part of it is that you get to start another project and that is always such a joy.

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I made this shawl as part of the Crafts from the Cwtch Make-Along. The idea was to crochet or knit a shawl using a construction you hadn’t used before, which is such an awesome idea. Since I had been wanting to try one of the patterns from The Shawl Project by Joanne Scrace I though this was the perfect opportunity and started looking for which one to choose. I realised then that when it comes to crochet shawls, I haven’t really worked any of them that haven’t used tunisian crochet (weird right?) so any of them would be a new construction for me. So I decided to go with the one that first caught my attention after I bought the book, the Transposition shawl.

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This shawl is worked from the centre-out and the pattern becomes more open as you work your way down. It is so gorgeous! I used Titus 4ply by Eden Cottage Yarns in the colour Marigold and I love this colour so much. Now, I had been wanting to try a yellow-gold-mustardy colour for ages now, but I always thought it wouldn’t go with my South American complexion. When I saw this yarn on Victoria’s Instagram feed though, I knew I had to try it. I figured that a shawl would be a smart way to see if the colour suited me and if it didn’t I could give it to someone as a gift. It turns out I can pull off this colour, yay! I see a gold cardigan in my future… 🙂

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This pattern was so quick to make, it only uses one 100g skein of 4-ply yarn so you can use something a bit more luxurious without having to invest too much money in the project, I definitely recommend you try the pattern.

Have you finished anything recently? Would love to hear what you are working on 🙂

x

Sol

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Freyja journey: More charts

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How’s it going? I am here today with another update of this Freyja journey. Remember Laura from Made in Oxford is also blogging about her Freyja so make sure to check it out.

Since my last post I have been working slowly away with the charts on the pattern. It requires all my attention, I don’t even put music on to avoid mistakes. I am definitely getting more used to the rhythm and since I will have to repeat each chart more than 20 times I know it will get easier. Patience is required and I am giving all I have 🙂

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I am loving to see how it is taking shape, it is such a smart pattern. You know when you are working on a pattern and you see all these crazy charts or instructions and you really can’t tell how it will translate into your project? I was definitely on that stage a week ago, I couldn’t see the end game but now it is all fitting into place and it is looking amazing.

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Isn’t it unbelievable how some designers can come up with such gorgeous creations? Their talent will never cease to amaze me, how they can take individual stitches and play with them in such intricate ways to turn them into a beautiful piece of art.

I will continue to share short posts with my progress but probably less often since it will take some time to get through these charts and it is just more of the same.

Thank you again for reading and keeping us company in this Freyja journey.

x

Sol

Freyja journey: Charts

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If you have been following the Freyja journey you will know that it has taken a long time to get that first row finished. After many (too many) stitch markers and many hours of sitting down in concentration it is finally done! And I was only off a couple of stitches in the end so nothing that couldn’t be easily fixed (or hidden).

By the time you are done with that first row you need to make sure that you ended up with the almost 500 stitches stated in the pattern, which wasn’t easy to count. My advise is to count every 50 stitches and place a marker, that way when you lose your count you just have to begin again from the last marker and not from the beginning.

After an easy row of dc the dreaded charts have begun. There are three charts in total and you alternate them through the pattern until you have run out of those 500 stitches. It will make you laugh a bit when I tell you it took me a couple of hours to get through the first 20 stitches…! Only a few hundred to go… I don’t even want to do the math, I just know it will take a while and that is even considering I should go faster once I’ve repeated the charts a few times. But as I said in my last post, patience is a virtue and this shawl is in no rush at the moment.

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If you know the pattern you may have seen there is a new stitch called “cnupps” which some people are a bit afraid of before starting the pattern. The designer has a really good video explaining everything and I have had no issues with them. I do think that the fabric around the little clusters is not very nice since it has to stretch to give them space, but hopefully once blocked all will be good. In case you are following the pattern, in the first chart there are some numbers on the top and bottom, there is no explanation for them in the pattern but they are only the number of vertical bars before and after the cnupps so that you can keep track of your loops.

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You can see the results of the first chart in the pictures with the little cnupps coming off the surface, I really like them even if they take a bit of time. Like many other things in life it requires time and gentleness, concentration and precision. This is not an easy pattern but is has been very satisfying indeed, hope I remember this and not only that it took forever to finish!

x

Sol

Freyja journey: Patience is a virtue

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My mum always used to say: “patience is a virtue”. She said this because she, as a very impatient person like myself, understood the value of patience. I am the kind of person who goes about life as if there is never enough time: I am always running to the the next thing which is I think the basis for my impatience. There is no time for slowness or inefficiency, from trying to open a package that seems like it was made to never be opened or to pair my boyfriends socks which are all black except for this tiny little embroidery in different colours (I keep trying to convince him no one will notice if they are different).

So it is no wonder that until recently I was also impatient with my crochet projects. I wouldn’t swatch before a garment, or I would use a DK yarn even when I knew the pattern would work a lot better with a 4ply so that I could get started sooner, I would not block my finished project because I couldn’t wait to start the next one and I would not do a proper swatch for my designs but just go straight for the sample instead (I still do this actually…). And most important of all the rules for the impatient crocheter: you don’t rip out, you just pretend like the mistake isn’t there. Because who has time to work all that section again, right?

If you are reading this and nodding (don’t pretend like your weren’t now!), then let me give you a small advice. It will probably sound ridiculous but hang with me for a moment. Here it goes:

If you actually take the time, if you are patient with your projects, you will enjoy them more.

I know, it sounds crazy right? But people, it is true. Not easy, but definitely true.

I am still an impatient crocheter in recovery but I can honestly say that ever since I started taking more time planning my projects, choosing my yarn, making proper swatches, weaving in ends properly, working proper seams and everything else that a patient person would do, I have actually enjoyed my craft a lot more. I not only feel better because the finished product looks and fits better, but I also feel very proud of myself for taking the time to re-do that bit that wasn’t looking very well, or to start again with a different hook size to get a nicer drape. This realisation has helped grow this idea of mine to create a handmade wardrobe that I will want to wear, and time is definitely key in that process. Time and of course, patience. Patience to understand that it is time well spent.

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As the weekend flew by I didn’t have much time to work on my Freyja but I was determined to finish that Row 1 before this next post. Why? Who knows, no one is timing me and I am sure you won’t mind if I take a bit longer. When I had a few hours to spare on Sunday I started working on it and had made some good progress until I realised I made a mistake right after I picked it up that day. I could either get to the end of the row and try to make it work somehow, or rip all I had done in those precious hours. I am proud to say I didn’t think (that long) before deciding to just undo my work and start again.

It is not always easy and I still don’t follow my own advice every now and again. And of course patience has its limits and I won’t start a whole sweater again if I made the mistake right at the beginning (which just happened with my Alyssium cardi by the way). But here I am, with no progress with my Freyja compared to last week and feeling quite good about it. The world hasn’t ended, that mistake is not there to annoy me anymore and that shawl is still going to get finished, just maybe a few days later than planned. For someone so used to running about, I am really enjoying to take things slow for a while.

x

Sol

Freyja journey: Getting through Row 1

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I love short weeks, it is so amazing that it is Wednesday already! Wednesdays will be the day when Laura from Made in Oxford and I have planned to keep you updated on our progress on the Freyja shawl by Aoibhe Ni, you can check the first post here where I talked a bit about the pattern and the yarn I am using.

I am halfway through Row 1 of the pattern after working on it over the long weekend. As I have mentioned before, Aoibhe Ni uses a special construction in some of her designs that takes some time to get used to. You basically start with a VERY long chain (we are talking hundreds here) after which you work perpendicular rows and attach the end of each row to the initial chain until you run out of chains. Since the foundation chain consisted of hundreds of chains, that means hundreds of rows that need to be worked up and it takes a while… I am a bit past the middle of the first row and can’t wait to see the end of it!

It is looking quite nice already though, and this yarn.. I LOVE IT. It is Rooster Delightful Lace and it is SO soft and creates such a nice fabric that I think this is going to be shawl that will be around my neck quite a lot once it is finished.

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In case anyone of you is working on Freyja or thinking about trying it in the future I thought I should give you some tips from my experience with this pattern so far:

  • I don’t usually swatch for shawls but when I started working on this pattern I wished I had because I realised after a few perpendicular rows that I didn’t really like how the fabric looked. Tunisian crochet with lace-weight yarn can look too loose for me sometimes which I think makes the stitches look uneven. I ended up starting again with a smaller hook size and I am really liking the way the stitches look now.
  • The pattern says to begin with a long foundation chain, however I chose to work foundation double crochets instead. There is a tutorial for this stitch in my Tutorials page if you are not familiar with this stitch. I think it gives it a nicer and sturdier edge than if I were just doing a chain.
  • There are many lines to the instructions of Row 1 and the only way I could keep track of where I was in the pattern was to use one stitch marker per line, which is a lot of stitch markers! I am actually running out and will have to turn to using safety pins but it is the only way I will ever find a mistake if necessary.
  • With this method of construction there is always the chance that you will work through the lines of instruction in Row 1 and realise that you still have more lines to work but have run out of chains in your foundation or the other way around. I already know I am off by one or two chains if my counting is right and as long it is not much more than that I am not even going to try and find what I did wrong. You can always work two perpendicular rows into just one chain, or even skip the last one and no one will know 🙂

That is all I can share so far with this shawl, hopefully by this time next week I will have survived this first row and will be tackling another challenge. I have to say it feels great to work a difficult pattern again, I hadn’t done this in a while and I am really enjoying the satisfaction I get from every milestone I achieve. I am always looking for simplicity when designing patterns, mostly because of my inexperience in design but I truly hope one day I can create a challenge as beautiful as this pattern.

Hope you have a nice end of the week!

x

Sol

 

March WIPs and FOs

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March is almost gone so I thought it might be a good time to give you an update on what I am working on at the moment and what I plan to start soon as well. First, my Lopi shawl is finished and I love it so much! This pattern is the Warm Winter Shawl by Patrick Hassel-Zein and it is not the best pattern out there, not many explanations and I never understood what the designer did for the edging so just did my own thing, but if you are comfortable with tunisian crochet you can figure it out quickly from the pictures.

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The best part about this shawl is that I am wearing it! I wear it at home mostly but have also ventured out with it so I am really excited 🙂 You may be wondering what happened after my blocking panic which I shared a few posts ago… well, it did smell horribly of conditioner once it dried so I had to ventilate it for a few days to make it go away but it is fine now. It is not extremely soft, but still wearable around the neck for me even though I mostly wear it as a shawl around my shoulders. It should also soften with use and washing so it can only get better now 🙂

After the EYF I started working on the Alyssium cardigan by Joanne Scrace, which I actually tried on at the Crochet Project stall, very exciting! It is coming along nicely and so far the pattern has been very easy to follow, I am using the exact same yarn as the sample which is Eden Cottage Yarns Pendle 4ply, a lovely hand dyed merino yarn in the colour Dusk. This cardigan fits so nicely with my new aspiration of a handmade wardrobe, I am sure that once finished it will get loads of use, can’t wait to wear it.

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At the EYF I mostly bought yarn for garments that I have had my eye on for a long time, so hopefully I will slowly start building a collection of handmade clothes and accessories that I love to wear. Wouldn’t that be awesome? I am even considering to take some sewing classes to broaden my skills to create my own clothes  (and project bags!) but I am not sure if it would be very wise considering the little time I have available at the moment. I will let you know what happens…

Finally, I have been experimenting with tunisian crochet in the round, this is my first attempt at this technique and of course I couldn’t just do something simple… I had to do a stitch pattern that changes colour not only for the forward pass but also for the return pass. It is not bad, but I am not sure I could make a pattern for this since even though it is simple, it is very difficult to explain in a written form. I can of course just make it for myself but I feel like if I design something I should be sharing it, not sure where this comes from but it is how I feel.

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I am struggling with that a lot lately, since I can’t just post a pattern for you guys and hope you will figure it out, that is not how I like to do things. I want to make sure that you can follow it and that you can easily refer to a good tutorial (mine or someone else’s) if you get stuck.

I am having that problem with my Moroccan bag pattern at the moment since I feel like I should explain how tapestry crochet works and do a tutorial for the bag but that will delay the pattern quite a lot and it takes such a long time to shoot pictures for tutorials. This perfectionism with my patterns is what is making me design less and less since I just can’t find the time anymore, but we will see, maybe I just need to post less patterns and dedicate the time I need to get them the way I like it, no matter how long it takes me to finally get the instructions here. Do you mind waiting? I would really like your opinion on this so let me know what you think.

Those are my current projects, I will be adding one this week since Laura from Made in Oxford and I will be working on the Freyja shawl together, I am very excited to have a crochet partner for a pattern like this, I have a feeling I might get stuck on a few things but I am sure the finished product will be worth all the effort and having company will make it all much more enjoyable. I am still deciding on yarn so will share that with you once I make up my mind (so many choices!).

Hope you are having a great weekend, looking forward to a short week and some extra hooking time during Easter 🙂 Take care!

x

Sol

 

 

Free Pattern: Uva Shawl

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Ravelry link

I am very excited to share another pattern with you, this time a shawl I have named “Uva” which means “grape” in Spanish. I just can’t help thinking of grapes when I look at it! This shawl uses just two stitches, dc and dtr, and it is so easy to make. I used Ginger’s Hand Dyed Splendor in Wine O’Clock (read about this yarn here) and I just love the final result.

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I mentioned I would recommend other yarns for this pattern that are a bit more budget friendly (but if you can buy this yarn I definitely recommend it), you could really use any other 4ply yarn, and even a DK one would still be OK, but here are some recommendations for my UK readers:

Yeoman Yarns Sport 4 ply – This yarn is 100% merino wool sold in 400gr cones for a bit less than 20 pounds, I have used it in shawls and it is lovely, great stitch definition. You will have plenty leftover to make other things with it as well.

Wendy Merino 4ply: This is a very nice yarn and it is sold in 50gr balls so that you can just get what you need for this project.

King Cole Merino Blend 4 ply: I used this yarn for my fingerless mitts and I think it is quite good for the price. You can buy it in balls or cones and some stores like Ginger Twist Studio sell them by weight (multiples of 50g) so that you can get just what you need.

Hope that helps 😉 And here is the pattern!

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Uva Shawl Pattern

This pattern has an increase section and a decrease section. Basically you are working the shawl sideways: you start on one end of the shawl with very few stitches and increase every two rows until you get to the middle section, then start decreasing until you have very few stitches again and get to the other end of the shawl.

The shawl measures 140cm long and it is 36cm at the widest part. Gauge is not very important, because of the way the shawl is constructed you can simply work up until you have a bit over half the yarn leftover and then start decreasing. If you prefer to work according to gauge you can work the pattern (one row of the stitch pattern repeat explained below followed by one row of dc). With a 3.5mm hook and 4ply yarn you should get 20 st and 22 rows in 10cmx10cm.

Materials

2 x 100g skeins Ginger’s Hand Dyed Splendor 4ply in Wine O’Clock (used 160gr/640m). See above for other yarn options.

3.5mm hook

Needle to weave in ends

Abbreviations

ch – chain

dc – UK double crochet

dtr – UK double treble

Stitch Guide

UK double treble: yarn over hook twice, insert hook in stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop, (yarn over pull through 2 loops on hook) 3 times.

dc2tog: insert hook in stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop, insert hook in next stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop, yarn over and pull through 3 loops on hook.

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Tip for an easier way to follow the pattern: 

Imagen 4This pattern is very simple an easy to follow without thinking about it much or counting the stitches in each row. The instructions are below and you can just follow each line all the way through the many rows but I thought I would share an easy way to do this pattern that you would find out eventually but why not save you some time!

Ok so, this pattern starts with an increase section and finishes with a decrease section. I will explain it for the increase one since it comes first and after understanding that one the decrease will come easy to you. When you are in the increase section yo do a row of the stitch pattern (let’s call that to the rows that have the little bobbles), followed by a row of dc in every stitch all the way until the last st where you do two dc, therefore you increase 1dc every two rows.

Now, the rows with the stitch pattern (with the bobbles) are very easy to do without thinking about them because there are no increases or decreases, and no matter in what part of the shawl you are a stitch pattern row will be a repeat of 6 stitches with just a couple of things to bear in mind.

Let’s see the 6 stitches: dtr, dc, dtr, dc, dc, dc (or dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc). Now imagine you are in ANY row where you do the stitch pattern repeat: You always ch 1 and dc in first st. Now start your 6-stitch-repeat (dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc) all the way until you get to the last st. No matter in what part of the 6-stitch-repeat you ended up, dc in the last dc and turn for the next row (which in the increase section will be an increase row and in the decrease section will be a decrease row). So that is all: dc in first st, dc in last st, and fill the space in between with as many repeats of the 6-stitch-repeat as you can fit, no matter if the last repeat is not a full one.

So let’s put it in practice so that you see how easy it is. Let’s say you are in Row 18 so you have just finished an increase row that left you with 11 sts to work.

So ch 1, dc in first st, start with the 6-stitch-repeat and stop when you have one stitch left: you do the repeat once, then start the second one: dtr, dc, dtr…. and then you have only one st left, so you stop the repeat and do a dc.

This is for EVERY stitch pattern row, even for the decrease section. In this section the only difference is that you do a decrease row instead of an increase row, meaning that you dc all the way through until the last two stitches, where you do a dc2tog.

I would advise you start following the pattern until Row 11 and then try this tip to continue working your shawl.

Notes

  • Beginning chain does not count as a st.
  • Turn your work after each row.
  • It doesn’t really matter if you chain 1 and then turn, or turn and chain 1. See what you like best and go with that.
  • Stitch number at end of row instruction corresponds to number of sts in that row. If this doesn’t appear in the row it means it has the same number of sts as the last one.

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Instructions

Increase section
Ch4.

Row 1: dc in second ch from hook, 2dc. Turn (3 st).

Row 2: ch 1, 3dc. Turn.

Row 3: ch 1, 2dc, 2dc in last dc. Turn (4st).

Row 4: ch 1, dc in first dc, dtr, 2dc. Turn.

Row 5: ch 1, 3dc, 2dc in last dc. Turn (5st).

Row 6: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, dc. Turn.

Row 7: ch 1, 4dc, 2dc in last dc. Turn (6st).

Row 8: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, dc. Turn.

Row 9: ch 1, 5dc, 2dc in last dc. Turn (7st).

Row 10: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc. Turn.

Row 11: ch 1, 6dc, 2dc in last dc. Turn (8st).

Row 12: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 3dc. Turn.

Row 13: ch 1, 7dc, 2dc in last dc. Turn (9st).

Row 14: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc, dtr, dc. Turn.

Row 15: ch 1, 8dc, 2dc in last dc. Turn (10st).

Row 16: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc, dtr, 2dc. Turn.

Row 17: ch 1, 9dc, 2dc in last dc. Turn (11st).

Row 18: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc, (dtr, dc) two times. Turn.

Row 19: ch 1, 10dc, 2dc in last dc. Turn (12st).

Row 20: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc, (dtr, dc) two times, dc. Turn.

Row 21: ch 1, 11dc, 2dc in last dc. Turn (13st).

Row 22: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc. Turn.

Row 23: ch 1, 12dc, 2dc in last dc. Turn (14st).

Row 24: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last st, dc in last dc. Turn.

Row 25: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, 2dc in last dc. Turn (15st)

Row 26: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last 2 st, dtr, dc in last dc. Turn.

Row 27: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, 2dc in last dc. Turn (16st)

Row 28: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last 3 st, dtr, 2dc. Turn.

Row 29: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, 2dc in last dc. Turn (17st)

Row 30: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last 4 st, (dtr, dc) two times. Turn.

Row 31: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, 2dc in last dc. Turn (18st)

Row 32: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last 5 st, (dtr, dc) two times, dc in last dc. Turn.

Row 33: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, 2dc in last dc. Turn (19st)

Row 34: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * across. Turn.

Row 35: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, 2dc in last dc. Turn (20st)

Repeat Rows 24 to 35 (twelve rows) nine times. You will have 143 rows in total and 74 sts in Row 143.

Row 144: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last st, dc in last dc. Turn.

Row 145: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, 2dc in last dc. Turn (75st)

Row 146: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last 2 st, dtr, dc in last dc. Turn.

Row 147: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, 2dc in last dc. Turn (76st)

Row 148: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last 3 st, dtr, 2dc. Turn.

Row 149: ch 1, dc in each st across. Turn (76st)

 

Decrease Section

Row 1: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last 3 st, dtr, 2dc. Turn.

Row 2: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (75st).

Row 3: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last 2 st, dtr, dc in last dc. Turn.

Row 4: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (74st).

Row 5: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last st, dc in last dc.

Row 6: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (73st).

Row 7: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * across. Turn.

Row 8: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (72st).

Row 9: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last 5 st, (dtr, dc) two times, dc in last dc. Turn.

Row 10: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (71st).

Row 11: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last 4 st, (dtr, dc) two times. Turn.

Row 12: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (70st).

Repeat Rows 1 to 12 nine times, you will have 120 rows in total and will finish Row 120 with 16 st.

Row 121: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last 3 st, dtr, 2dc. Turn.

Row 122: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (15st).

Row 123: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last 2 st, dtr, dc in last dc. Turn.

Row 124: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (14st).

Row 125: ch 1, dc in first dc; *dtr, dc, dtr, 3dc, rep from * until last st, dc in last dc. Turn.

Row 126: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (13st).

Row 127: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc. Turn.

Row 128: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (12st).

Row 129: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc, (dtr, dc) two times, dc. Turn.

Row 130: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (11st).

Row 131: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc, (dtr, dc) two times. Turn.

Row 132: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (10st).

Row 133: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc, dtr, 2dc. Turn.

Row 134: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (9st).

Row 135: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc, dtr, dc. Turn.

Row 136: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (8st).

Row 137: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 3dc. Turn.

Row 138: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (7st).

Row 139: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, 2dc. Turn.

Row 140: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (6st).

Row 141: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, dc. Turn.

Row 142: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (5st).

Row 143: ch 1, dc in first dc, (dtr, dc) two times, dc. Turn.

Row 144: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (4st).

Row 145: ch 1, dc in first dc, dtr, 2dc. Turn.

Row 146: ch 1, dc in each st across until last st, dc2tog in last two st. Turn (3st).

Row 147: ch 1, 3dc. Turn.

Row 148: ch 1, dc in first dc, dc2tog in last two st. (2st).

Don’t cut yarn.

 

Edging 

With right side of shawl facing you, turn to work on bottom edge of the shawl.

Row 1: ch 1, 1dc per row until middle of the shawl (Row 149), 3dc, 1dc per row until the end. Turn (301 sts). Don’t worry too much about where you do the dc and it is fine if you miss a row at some point, try to get the amount of stitches required to get the edge to match up better, though it is not the end of the world if it doesn’t 😉

Row 2: ch 1, *(dc, ch3, dc) in next st, skip 1dc, 3dc, repeat from * until last st, (dc, ch 3, dc) in last st.

Fasten off.

Block lightly (steam block or pin it to the size you want, spray it with some water and let it dry).

 

As usual, please let me know if you have any questions, hope you like it!

x

Sol